theappealoftheunreal.com research blog

For my research, I’ve set up a separate blog. Sometimes blogposts will appear both at www.theappealoftheunreal.com and at www.deephistoriesfragilememories.com.

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The research blog is made for several reasons: the posts collect all that has to do with the research, it functions as a reminder, and as a way to communicate progress and findings. Please keep in mind this blog is a work in progress.


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  • 0. The internet is made by people. This realization lingers in the codes that make up the websites in our browsers, in the collaborative effort of the Wikipedia project, and in virtually any icon, emoji, or button. Even machine learning, which is often mistaken for artificial intelligence, is often based on manual input of data […]
  • March, 9, 2020. First visit to the American Museum of Natural History. We’re about 6 weeks into the Covid-19 corona virus frenzy, which became global right before I traveled to the U.S. as part of my residency at Residency Unlimited in Brooklyn, New York. Prior to my trip, I had a normal case of a […]
  • The Solastalgia project now has its own subsite: www.solastalgia.theappealoftheunreal.com.
  • A shift in research focus from visual illusions to something more relevant. Meet Solastalgia. More on this soon.
  • A skeuomorph object wants you to believe it's made of another material: it's an imitation-look. This post will expand.
  • The Three Motions of Loom: shuttles. An experimental non linear text on weaving as animation and time-traveling as a research method.
  • An experiment in animating a double sided tapestry.
  • Château de Breteuil near Paris, houses a collection of automata and period room dioramas, depicting historical events that may or may not have taken place in the castle. Visited Oct. 2019.
  • Work in progress: an overview of visual illusions and illusionist effects: suggestions of depth and/or movement.
  • Daguerre and Bouton's only remaining diorama at the church of Bry-sur-Marne: a piece of religious high-tech theatre. Visited October 2019.
Follow Alexandra Crouwers:
Alexandra Crouwers (NL, °1974) is a visual artist working in the digital realm. Her works are made by using a combination of 3D modeling and animation, and post-production, and can take many forms. From 2019 on, she's a doctoral researcher in art and animation at Leuven University/LUCA School of arts, Brussels, under supervision of Wendy Morris.
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